List of High-Protein Foods and Amount of Protein in Each

High protein foods-clean eating-ndpersonaltraining

High protein foods |clean eating |ndpersonaltraining

Getting adequate protein in your diet can offer a myriad of health benefits. Studies have shown protein can help whether you are looking to lose weight, bulk up, improve heart health or boost your energy. Incorporating lean protein into your diet is a critical component of a healthy eating plan.

 Proteins are the body’s building blocks: bones, muscles, skin and blood are all made up of protein. After a tough workout, muscles are rebuilt and repaired by the proteins you eat. Because of this, the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine in a joint statement recommended athletes get 0.5 to 0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight.
When trying to lose weight, protein foods help you feel full longer, likely reducing the total number of calories eaten per day. A 2008 study in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition” showed that protein increases satiety, and may increase metabolism. Consuming protein will also help the body maintain lean muscle mass, which is critical for a healthy weight loss plan.
Below is a list of some common foods and their protein content. Try and include protein sources from all the groups to keep your diet varied and packed full of vitamins and nutrients.

As a shortcut: An ounce of meat or fish has approximately 7 grams of protein if cooked, and about 6 grams if raw.

Beef

  • Hamburger patty, 4 oz – 28 grams protein
  • Steak, 6 oz – 42 grams
  • Most cuts of beef – 7 grams of protein per ounce

Chicken

  • Chicken breast, 3.5 oz – 30 grams protein
  • Chicken thigh – 10 grams (for average size)
  • Drumstick – 11 grams
  • Wing – 6 grams
  • Chicken meat, cooked, 4 oz – 35 grams

Fish

  • Most fish fillets or steaks are about 22 grams of protein for 3 ½ oz (100 grams) of cooked fish, or 6 grams per ounce
  • tuna, 6 oz can – 40 grams of protein

 Pork

  • Pork chop, average – 22 grams protein
  • Pork loin or tenderloin, 4 oz – 29 grams
  • Ham, 3 oz serving – 19 grams
  • Ground pork, 1 oz raw – 5 grams; 3 oz cooked – 22 grams
  • Bacon, 1 slice – 3 grams
  • Canadian-style bacon (back bacon), slice – 5 – 6 grams

Eggs and Dairy

  • Egg, large – 6 grams protein
  • Milk, 1 cup – 8 grams
  • Cottage cheese, ½ cup – 15 grams
  • Yogurt, 1 cup – usually 8-12 grams, check label
  • Soft cheeses (Mozzarella, Brie, Camembert) – 6 grams per oz
  • Medium cheeses (Cheddar, Swiss) – 7 or 8 grams per oz
  • Hard cheeses (Parmesan) – 10 grams per oz

Beans (including soy)

  • Tofu, ½ cup 20 grams protein
  • Tofu, 1 oz, 2.3 grams
  • Soy milk, 1 cup – 6 -10 grams
  • Most beans (black, pinto, lentils, etc) about 7-10 grams protein per half cup of cooked beans
  • Soy beans, ½ cup cooked – 14 grams protein
  • Split peas, ½ cup cooked – 8 grams

Nuts and Seeds

  • Peanut butter, 2 Tablespoons – 8 grams protein
  • Almonds, ¼ cup – 8 grams
  • Peanuts, ¼ cup – 9 grams
  • Cashews, ¼ cup – 5 grams
  • Pecans, ¼ cup – 2.5 grams
  • Sunflower seeds, ¼ cup – 6 grams
  • Pumpkin seeds, ¼ cup – 8 grams
  • Flax seeds – ¼ cup – 8 grams

Try and include animal and plant based protein sources to keep your diet varied and packed full of vitamins and nutrients.

Nerseh – Personal trainer – ND Personal training